Church Building in Tanzania

This church building-in-progress will soon house a congregation of 38 members and counting in a remote village in Tanzania.

George Chombo, one of the members of TWFTW’s Department of Promotions, visited this Nguu-speaking village at the end of last year and distributed recently printed New Testaments to the people. For the first time, these people were able to read the Bible and the words of Jesus Christ in their mother tongue!

At the time, the church only had 9 members, but in only 4 months it has grown now that the people have been reading the Word of God in their own language. Praise God for the faithfulness of the Nguu translators and of this pastor and his family who are building the church!

The Nguu Old Testament translation is currently 34% complete. Help the Nguu people to receive the complete Bible in their heart language!

Story and photos supplied by George Chombo.

God Speaks Chikunda

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Moses Kaputi is a middle aged man from the Chikunda speaking community of Kanyemba in the Dande Region of Zimbabwe. He is married to Fungai Dumba and they are blessed with four children, two boys and two girls.

Chikunda is spoken in Zimbabwe, Zambia, and Mozambique. There is already a New Testament in Chikunda which has been published and distributed in the Kanyemba area. Moses says that before they had this New Testament in Chikunda, they would just try to guess from the Shona Bible (Shona is also spoken in Zimbabwe) what God was saying to them, but now that they have the Chikunda New Testament it is like God speaks Chikunda, and they can understand Him.

“Now I understand that before everything was, God was,” says Moses, “and all things came into existence through God. Therefore if I find myself in any difficulty, I know that God is all powerful, since nothing existed or exists outside of Him.” 

The Chikunda New Testament has also helped them in the making of the Jesus Film in Chikunda. The Chikunda people were delighted to watch Jesus speaking in their heart language! The elderly people in the community can now also read the Word in their mother tongue, and now they finally know that God is not only for the white people or the Shona people, but is also for the Chikunda people!

Story and photo supplied by Piniel Tawanda Zimbizi.

I am a Child of God!

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Kofi John is a disabled man in the Pogoro-speaking village of Isongo, Tanzania. Although he has been disabled since birth, he has a full life, with a wife, five children, and a variety of livestock. He and his family make their living through farming the land and keeping chickens and ducks. He shares with great excitement about the goodness of God in his life since he read the Word of God in Pogoro.

“It is a great benefit to have a Bible which was written in your mother tongue, because it speaks directly to your heart. God is the owner of all languages. We feel so happy in our hearts when we read the Pogoro Bible because we know that God is speaking to us.”

After the release of the Pogoro New Testament, Kofi was also released from his loneliness. He started meeting regularly with a group of people to discuss the Bible and to pray with them. Now that they have the Word of God in their mother tongue, they are eager to fellowship together and study this Bible that they can now clearly understand.

“The Pogoro Bible made me see that I am very important to God,” Kofi John told us. “I read about Jesus and Peter and John healing cripples, and the love God has for us, and I know now that God did not create me by mistake. It has renewed my mind and I know that I am a child of God.”

A Longing for The Word

The Kharam people have been longing for the Word of God in their own language, and now a Kharam translation project is being facilitated by The Word for the World! They recently received the Gospel of John and we expect the New Testament to be ready for print by the end of 2019.

Become part of the vision to bring God's Word to all people in their heart language by 2050! Commit to give.

We Give Thanks to Him!

 

“Enter his gates with thanksgiving

and his courts with praise;

give thanks to him and praise his name.”

-Psalm 100:4


 

This has been a year full of the blessings and abundance of God and we are filled with thanksgiving for His goodness, His provision, His strengthening, and His faithfulness! Here are just a few of the things that we are thanking God for:

  • The release of the Sakachep New Testament and the distribution of over 15,000 copies in Southeast Asia!

  • The amazing impact that the Word of God has been having in the Matengo community in Tanzania as translated portions of the New Testament are released to the people.

  • In Zambia, the widely celebrated and much anticipated release of the Soli new Testament despite the translation team experiencing illness, drought, and death. We praise God for their perseverance and for the Lord sustaining them through their work!

  • The joyful anticipation of the Kalanga and Kore Kore people groups in Zimbabwe as the translation teams work hard to bring the Bible to their people in their own language.

  • The many testimonies of physical, emotional, and spiritual healing that have occurred in communities that now have the Word of God in their mother tongue!

  • The 26 successful training events that we’ve held in 8 countries over the past year, and the 2 that are still to come before the end of 2018.

Last but surely not least, we are thankful beyond words for you; your prayers, your unending support, your encouragement, and your unwavering belief in the work we are doing. As you gather with family and friends, may you have a blessed, restful Thanksgiving and receive the abundant blessings of God in your life.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Veronique Krüger

 

Connect with The Word For The World

People of the Book

In Tanzania, 11 of the 15 local people who review the Ndendeule translation as it is completed are Muslim. They are thrilled to have something written in their language, even if it is the Holy Bible!

A while ago, we told you the story of a man named Maulidi Kimbunga from this language community who could not see, but when he was attempting to read the Gospel of Mark in Ndendeule, God healed him and he was able to see again. Maulidi had been a Muslim, but through his encounter with God when he read the Gospel of Mark, he became a Christian. Since then he has gone to his eternal home, but the testimony of his life and faith has spread among the other Muslims in his community.

We pray that through Maulidi’s testimony, which has amazed his Muslim friends and family, and through reading the scripture translated into Ndendeule, more Muslims in Tanzania will encounter Christ and be transformed by His Word!

The Ndendeule project is well underway and the New Testament is 58% complete. To contribute to this project, click here.

Supplied by George Chombo.

The Feet That Bring Good News

Sometimes George Chombo, who works with The Word for the World’s Promotions department, carries Bibles on foot so that he can reach places and people that are unreachable by car or motorcycle. Recently he did this to bring some of the Nguu people their completed New Testament, and they were ecstatic to receive the Scripture in their own language! Many of the people are Muslim, but they are filled with joy that something like the Bible has been translated into their language, and they even gather together to read it.

One elderly man told George the good that God has done in his life since he received news of the Nguu Bible translation project. In 2016 he was very sick and could also not see with his left eye, so he had to rely on his right eye. Just before he went for an operation to improve the eye, he had a dream.

He said that he saw someone give him the Nguu Bible, and the person who gave it to him said, “You will not go for an operation for your eye, but instead you will be healed. But tell of this and speak with the older people in your village about the Nguu Bible.” When he woke up the next morning, he realized he could see out of his left eye! So he went right away to the church to tell his pastor about the dream, and the pastor told him, “Jesus Christ was the man in your dream, and He has healed you.” Praise God!

Story and photos supplied by George Chombo.

The Word in Zimbabwe

My name is Benita Nleya and I live in Hikwa Village, Zimbabwe. I'm grateful and thankful that there is going to be a Bible in our language of Kalanga soon. We have been struggling to interpret the Bible into Kalanga after it has been read in either English or Ndebele. When we have the Bible in our language, we will finally be able to understand it when we are reading, and also can teach the little ones who are fluent in Kalanga. So I'm grateful for this project. May it succeed, may God make it to succeed.

As for me, the Word of God has helped me a lot because I was a sickly person but because of prayers and the knowledge of the Word of God it helped me a lot in my life. So I'm grateful that there will be a Kalanga Bible that will help me understand the Word of God even better, because all my life is dependent upon God and Him only. Thank you.

Supplied by Piniel Tawanda Zimbizi. The Kalanga project is well underway and 30% of the New Testament has been translated so far. To contribute to the completion of the Kalanga Bible, click here.

Eyes of Light

Jesus made some pretty profound statements while he was here on this earth. Often times, a simple-seeming metaphor is not just food for thought, but a complex, sixteen-course, dining adventure for your mind! One of the great tasks for a Bible translator is to unravel these complexities and to make them clear in his or her own language and culture.

While working through the Gospel of Matthew, Soli translators working in Chongwe, Zambia got stuck on one such passage. In chapter 6, Jesus compares our eyes to lamps and says, “if your eye is bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light that is in you is darkness, how great is the darkness!” The Soli words for lamps connotate electricity, wires, and switches, so do we have Jesus talk about turning on and off lights? Do we change the metaphor or educate about Jewish lamps? How can we say the same thing differently? And, the questions are not only about a word, but the concepts too—how can light be darkness? Is this talking about the medically blind or the spiritually lost? What does God want to say to the Soli people?

Well, He not only gave insight to the translators but this passage became a larger metaphor for the project itself. Instead of talking about physical lamps and bulbs, the translators were inspired to talk about “sources” of light and darkness. This took on special meaning for the translators, because the Soli Bible Translation project has been a source of light shining in some dark places and situations.

Now, with the entire New Testament available in Soli, Jesus’ powerful and oft enigmatic words can be heard and understood in new and amazing ways! Yes, Jesus speaks Soli and now the New Testament messages of truth, love, and light are available for the Soli people to understand clearly—in their own language.

Joel Brown

A Soli Celebration!

It is a warm, Friday afternoon—the day before the Soli New Testament Launch—and six of us are tightly packed into a car, traveling through the Soli-lands, east of Lusaka, Zambia. I have never travelled through this part of country after the rains, and my heart is happy to see fields of corn and flowers stretching as far as I could see; all underneath the striking blue and white of the cloudy and endless African sky.

The rest of the day is busy with preparations; meetings with the High Chieftainess, headmen, and Soli Committee; and ensuring that nearly four thousand Soli New Testaments are delivered and secured. As I return home late that evening, I find myself still basking in the excitement—for tomorrow we celebrate something truly special: a people receiving something that is both a result of their own dedication, as well as the generosity of others—something which took faith and hard work—a longed for destination which is also the start of a new journey of discovery and understanding. The Soli New Testament is truly a gift from God, and the Soli are literally and metaphorically about to turn the page, and begin a new chapter in their walk with God.

The program reads as a tightly-packed, two-and-a-half-hour event—but you should know, there is no Zambian celebration that fits into a morning session! Dancing, music, and speeches abound—and we hear stories of victory and loss—of blessing and sacrifice. Throughout the many, varied, and colorful presentations, the heart and hand of God becomes clear—for the Soli people have come, just as they are, and they are loved by Him.

Joel Brown